43Tbps over a single fiber: World's fastest network would let you …

A research group at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), which was the first to break the one-terabit barrier in 2009, has today managed to squeeze 43 terabits per second over a single optical fiber with just one laser transmitter. In a more user-friendly unit, 43Tbps is equivalent to a transfer rate of around 5.4 terabytes per second — or 5,375 gigabytes to be exact. Yes, if you had your hands on DTU’s new fiber-optic network, you could transfer the entire contents of your 1TB hard drive in a fifth of a second — or, to put it another way, a 1GB DVD rip in 0.2 milliseconds

Vegas developer selling $7.85M mansion for bitcoin – Phys.org

A casino owner-turned-commercial developer is asking $7.85 million to sell a Las Vegas home, and he’s willing to accept the online currency bitcoin for the deal. Jack Sommer said he got the idea to seek bitcoin for his 25,000-square-foot (2,300-square meter) mansion from two of his sons, who’ve been involved in making and trading the currency. “The advantage is that we’re expanding our market and adding some notoriety,” Sommer said.

Paving the way for more efficient, video-rich internet – Phys.org

No internet user can have failed to notice the explosion of online videos. And with video traffic already accounting for more than 90 percent of consumer content, the trend is set to continue. But the internet, and in particular mobile internet, was not designed with videos in mind and, as a consequence, its architecture is very inefficient when handling video traffic.

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